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The number of women in the military has increased over the last few decades. As a result, the number of women Veterans also has increased. VA wants those women who are transitioning out of the military to know about the many specialized health care services available to them at VA. VA’s Women’s Health Transition Training (WHTT) program was developed by VA Women’s Health Services, with the Department of Defense and the Transition Assistance Program (TAP). A woman Veteran who uses VA health care teaches the four-hour, voluntary course. The training includes: The range of available women’s health care services offered by VA. Services include maternity care, contraception and gynecology. In addition, VA offers cancer screenings, whole health and mental health care services. The process and eligibility requirements for enrollment into VA health care. How to stay connected with other women Veterans through networks, resources and programs post-service. Who should attend the training? All service women who are transitioning within the next year can attend training. The WHTT is offering 100 in-person training events and 18 virtual training opportunities. The training is available both within the United States and overseas. The number of women Veterans is growing. In-person training runs from 8:30 a.m. until 4 p.m. local time. Dress is uniform of the day or civilian casual. Bring note-taking supplies and lunch. Virtual sessions will be available on the Adobe Connect Online platform. You will receive the direct link to access the training via email message after you register. A full list of upcoming training events, as well as the agenda and registration details, are available at https://www.whttforyou.com/registration. In fiscal 2018, there were 1.9 million women Veterans. Of these, over 780,000 have enrolled in VA health care. While that’s 41% of all women Veterans, VA is working to increase that number through the WHTT program. VA has a dedicated Center for Women Services office and a Women Veterans Program manager at each VA Medical Center nationwide. Veterans who are interested in receiving care at VA should contact the nearest VA Medical Center. The highest percentage of military women during the Vietnam Era was 2%, and 11% during the Gulf War. Currently, more than 19% of active duty is female. VA is here for you VA assigns women Veterans who receive VA health care to a dedicated primary care provider. That provider provides general primary care and is specially trained in women’s care. For more information on VA benefits and services provided to women Veterans, call the Women Veteran Call Center at 1-855-VA-WOMEN or 1-855-829-6636. Register today for a training near you: https://www.whttforyou.com/.
Heroes Linked provides professional development resources for Veterans, military spouses and transitioning service members. By offering mentoring and other support, the goal is to enhance professional networks, promote professional growth and potentially expand career opportunities. Resume advice, networking tips and assistance with finding Veteran-friendly jobs are a few of the professional development tools the non-profit gives to those enrolled in the no-cost program. Other services include assistance with medical accommodation in the workplace and post-military security clearance. How Heroes Linked Started Heroes Linked seeks to create digitally accessible mentoring programs for transitioning military members seeking post-service careers and pointing them toward available opportunities based on their skill sets. Who Can Join? All transitioning service members, separated or retired Veterans, military spouses, or Gold Star family members (family of a fallen soldier) are eligible to utilize Heroes Linked resources. All eligible individuals, called Advisees, will have access to personal, digital and phone-based professional development mentoring with private sector expert advisors. Advisees will be given guidance for every action that is performed on the Heroes Linked platform. How to Apply To apply for the program, interested individuals must register as an “Advisee” on the Heroes Linked application page. Advisees and Advisors will complete their profile, which identifies their expertise, areas of interest, goals, experience and desired outcomes. A matching algorithm recommends individuals of interest and initiates dialogue. Advisors or Advisees can start a conversation by sending an in-platform message to an individual. Once the message is received and accepted, the Advisee can submit various times and dates for a phone call. The Advisor will then approve a call time, then schedule it in the Heroes Linked platform. Both parties will then receive an email confirmation for the appointment, as well as an offer to sync to the individual’s personal calendar. For more on the Heroes Linked Program, visit https://heroeslinked.org. Find more information about Veteran and military employment resources here. The sharing of any non-VA information does not constitute an endorsement of products and services on part of the VA. Writer Sarah Concepcion and editor Michaela Yesis and graphic designer Sarah Kowalewski are student interns working for VA’s Digital Media Engagement team.
WASHINGTON — The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has a proposed $243.3 billion budget for fiscal year (FY) 2021. The 10.2% increase from FY 2020 will allow VA’s continued commitment to provide Veterans with high quality health care and timely access to benefits and services. “The budget request will ensure Veterans and their families experience health improvements and technological modernization advancements,” said VA Secretary Robert Wilkie. “That’s evidenced by the increase in budget funds we’re receiving — that not only increase health care services and benefits to Veterans — but allow VA to lead the way in forward thinking innovation.” Budget highlights The FY 2021 budget provides robust funding for the secretary’s top priorities. It includes $109.5 billion (an increase of $13.5 billion or 14.1%above 2020) in discretionary funding and resources for health care, benefits and national cemeteries. Additionally, there’s $133.8 billion (an increase of $9 billion or 7.2% above 2020) in mandatory funding for benefit programs, specifically: compensation and pensions, readjustment benefits, housing and insurance. MISSION Act:  Beginning June 6, 2019, VA launched its new and improved Veterans Community Care Program giving Veterans a choice about how best to meet their health care needs. More than 5,000 Veterans per week are accessing the new urgent care benefits provided through the MISSION Act. The FY 2021 request would provide resources to support expansion of the Program of Comprehensive Assistance for Family to eligible Veterans seriously injured in the line of duty on or before May 7, 1975.  Preventing Veteran Suicide:  $10.2 billion ($682 million above 2020) for mental health services includes $313 million for suicide prevention programs, a $76 million increase (32%) over FY 2020. Part of this funding will support President Trump’s Executive Order, President’s Roadmap to Empower Veterans and End a National Tragedy of Suicide (PREVENTS) program.  Women’s Health:  $626 million ($53 million or 9% above FY 2020) for gender-specific women’s health care. This increase will expand access to gynecology, provide more primary care services for women and enable VA to continue to identify and serve the health care needs of women Veterans.  Electronic Health Record Modernization (EHRM):  $2.6 billion ($1.2 billion above FY 2020) to continue implementation of a single longitudinal electronic health record (EHR) from active duty to Veteran status and ensure interoperability with the Department of Defense. In addition to funding continued EHR deployment to further sites, the FY 2021 request will accelerate nationwide deployment of the Centralized Scheduling Solution. Transforming Business Systems:  $221 million in the request will support the continued deployment of a modern integrated financial and acquisition management system. The request also includes $236 million for VA to transform its supply chain system through the implementation of the LogiCole solution (formerly Defense Medical Logistics Standard Support) and other supply chain improvements.   Blue Water Navy (BWN):  $137 million to continue implementing the Blue Water Navy Vietnam Veterans Act of 2019 (BWN) by ensuring sufficient staff are hired to support claims processing, handle call center activity, and conduct quality reviews. In FY 2021, VA expects to receive an estimated 70,000 BWN claims and appeals. VA has received more than14,000 BWN claims  — since Jan.  7 — and has already issued $7.5 million in retroactive benefit payments to 218 BWN Veterans and survivors.    VA National Cemeteries:  $360 million for increased burial access, partnering with stakeholders and preserving Veterans’ legacies. In 2019 the National Cemetery Administration achieved the highest customer satisfaction index for any organization in either the public or private sector from the American Customer Satisfaction Index. Capital Investments:  $1.9 billion for VA’s total construction program, including funding to complete the American Lake (Tacoma, Washington) and Long Beach (Long Beach, California) projects.   
The American Legion FEB 05, 2020   On property owned by American Legion Department of Texas 18th District Commander Kevin Black sit three RVs. Two of those are owned by American Legion Post 671 in Hutchinson County, Texas, and are the start of what Black and Post 671 hope will be a partial solution to veteran homelessness in the area. The RVs are used to provide housing for veterans who have slipped into homelessness for various reasons. It was three years ago that Black first helped a Korean and Vietnam War veteran who had lost both his house and wife within two weeks. “Literally he had nothing but his car and his Chihuahua,” said Black, the current commander and a Paid-Up-For-Life member of Post 671. An apartment was arranged for the veteran in Amarillo, but Black said the man hated living so far away. “So I just asked him, ‘Would you mind living in an RV if I built an RV park?’” Black said. “Literally a month later we had him in an RV, and it’s just cascaded from there.” Black has since moved in two more veterans into two other RVs on his property. “We’re hoping this year I’m going to get anywhere from 67 to 200 acres donated to us,” Black said. “If that happens, we’re going to build a bigger RV park where we can bring in the public and help grow with this.” The project recently was featured on ABC7 News as part of its new feature “Invisible”, which is a weekly effort to raise awareness about the homelessness issue in Amarillo and in the Texas Panhandle. It’s helped bring Post 671’s efforts more into the public eye, with Black saying there is potential for a large grant and the possibility of building tiny homes for veterans on any donated property. “If we get the right property, we may even build a new (post facility),” Black said. “We’ve got a lot going on.” The RVs, Black said, have the ability to provide an immediate answer to a veteran facing homelessness. “A true homeless person cannot get benefits because they don’t have a physical mailing address,” he said. “This gives them that address.” Black said that veterans who struggle transitioning into the civilian world can see other problems, such as post-traumatic stress disorder, amplified. The goal with Post 671’s project is to help alleviate that stress while working with both the Department of Veterans Affairs and the Veterans Resource Center in Amarillo. “Most of the people at the VA, the service providers, we have each other’s phone numbers and message each other seven days a week, it seems like,” Black said. “This is working great so far. It’s just something we can do here in our community."
By Steve Beynon/Stars and Stripes FEB 03, 2020   James Byrne, the deputy secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs, was fired Feb. 3 after holding the post for less than five months. VA Secretary Robert Wilkie said he terminated Byrne due to a loss in confidence in him. “Today, I dismissed VA Deputy Secretary James Byrne due to loss of confidence in Mr. Byrne’s ability to carry out his duties,” Wilkie said in the statement. “This decision is effective immediately.” Byrne, 55, was a former Marine infantry officer. He was sworn in Sept. 16 as deputy secretary and previously served as the department’s general counsel, leading the VA’s legal team, for about two years. Byrne was confirmed as deputy secretary by the Senate in a vote of 81-11. The VA’s top leadership has been in turmoil in recent years. President Donald Trump’s administration has gone through four deputy secretaries at the VA, with two of them in temporary acting positions. The Obama, Bush and Clinton administrations all had two deputy VA secretaries across both of their terms. The previous deputy secretary, Thomas Bowman, retired in June 2018 after being passed over twice for the position of acting secretary. Byrne took over as the VA’s second in command in August 2018, but he wasn’t confirmed until a year later. The VA has not yet named a deputy secretary to replace Byrne. Members of The American Legion can receive 50 percent discounts on annual subscriptions to the Stars and Stripes digital platform of exclusive military news, topics of interest to veterans, special features, photos and other content, including the daily e-newspaper, job listings and history. American Legion members can subscribe for $19.99 a year by visiting legion.stripes.com and using the coupon code LEGIONSTRONG when filling out the online form.
WASHINGTON — The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is accepting applications through March 17 for up to $15 million in grants for civic groups providing adaptive sports and therapeutic recreational opportunities to Veterans and members of the armed forces with disabilities. Application instructions and eligibility information for these grants — which will help qualified organizations plan, develop, manage and implement these programs — are available at VA Adaptive Sports Grant Program. “Built on VA clinical expertise and operations, with essential support from community partners, the adaptive sports grant program allows VA to extend its level of care beyond the clinical setting,” said VA Secretary Robert Wilkie. “We are pleased to offer grant funds to community organizations as it means there will be more Veterans engaging in the challenge of sports and more Veterans who are exposed to new skills for healthier living.” In 2019, VA awarded $14.9 million in adaptive sports grants to 126 organizations, estimated to serve more than 11,000 Veterans and service members from every state, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico. Of the total awarded, $1.5 million is being used to assist organizations that offer equine-assisted therapy to support mental health. All applications must be submitted to www.grants.gov by 8 p.m. EST, March 17. VA will announce awards based on a competitive selection in fall 2020.
WASHINGTON – The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) released in January an updated Department of Defense (DOD) list of locations outside of Vietnam where tactical herbicides were used, tested or stored by the United States military. “This update was necessary to improve accuracy and communication of information,” said VA Secretary Robert Wilkie. “VA depends on DOD to provide information regarding in-service environmental exposure for disability claims based on exposure to herbicides outside of Vietnam." DOD conducted a thorough review of research, reports and government publications in response to a November 2018 Government Accountability Office report. “DOD will continue to be responsive to the needs of our interagency partners in all matters related to taking care of both current and former service members,” said Defense Secretary Mark T. Esper. “The updated list includes Agents Orange, Pink, Green, Purple, Blue and White and other chemicals and will be updated as verifiable information becomes available.” Veterans who were exposed to Agent Orange or other herbicides during service may be eligible for a variety of VA benefits, including an Agent Orange Registry health exam, health care and disability compensation for diseases associated with exposure. Their dependents and survivors also may be eligible for benefits.
Newswise — WASHINGTON -- To help service members perform better in the field, military training emphasizes the importance of certain traits associated with traditional masculinity, including suppression of emotion and self-reliance. But when veterans return home, strict adherence to these traits can become detrimental, leading to more severe post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms and making it more difficult to treat, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. “These findings suggest that veterans with rigid adherence to traditional masculinity may be at increased risk for developing PTSD, may have more severe PTSD symptoms and may be less likely to seek mental health treatment for PTSD,” said Elizabeth Neilson, PhD, of Morehead University and the lead author on the study. The research was published in the journal Psychology of Men and Masculinities. Neilson and her co-authors analyzed data from 17 studies, comprising more than 3,500 military veterans, conducted in the last 25 years that involved, at least in part, measuring the relationship between adherence to traditional masculine ideals and trauma-related symptoms. The studies primarily focused on men, but one included both male and female participants. While most studies were conducted in the United States, the researchers also included studies from Canada, the United Kingdom, Israel and Vietnam. “Overall, we found that strict adherence to masculine norms was associated with more severe PTSD symptoms in veterans, but more detailed analysis suggests that the association may specifically be caused by the veterans’ belief that they should control and restrict their emotions. In other words, they should be tough,” Neilson said. This held true for both male and female veterans. While all members of society are exposed to aspects of traditional masculinity, members of the military receive messages that normalize, reinforce and instill values of masculinity as part of their training, according to Neilson. “Previous research has found that military personnel report high levels of conformity to traditional masculine norms, such as emotional control, self-reliance and the importance of one’s job,” she said. “These values can promote self-confidence and skill-building in the field, but when a service member is confronted with physical or mental trauma, they can also contribute to more severe PTSD.” Traumatic experiences, including combat and sexual trauma, can lead to feelings of powerlessness and hopelessness, both of which are in direct opposition to what society expects of men: That they should be strong and in control. The discrepancy between reality and societal expectations can exacerbate PTSD symptoms. Research estimates as many as 23% of veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan experience PTSD . Adherence to masculine norms can also create barriers to getting necessary treatment, according to Neilson. Previous research on veterans returning from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan found pride in self-reliance and a belief that one should be able to handle mental health problems on one’s own kept service members from seeking help when they needed it. And even if veterans did seek treatment, the emphasis on stoicism and mental fortitude within both military culture and traditional masculinity could make treatment more difficult, she said. The two most widely used, evidence-based therapies for PTSD require explicit discussions of emotions, thoughts and behaviors related to traumatic experiences. PTSD is perpetuated by avoiding stimuli associated with a traumatic experience, including emotions. Successful PTSD treatment involves breaking that cycle of avoidance and confronting those stimuli, she said. “Both military culture and traditional masculine ideals lead to the avoidance of disclosure and speaking about traumatic experiences, which may interfere with appropriate treatment,” Neilson said. Another trend the researchers found was that veterans often try to reaffirm their masculinity following trauma, engaging in exaggerated stereotypical male behavior, such as aggression and increased sexual behavior, to compensate for the injury the trauma had on their identity, according to Neilson. “In one study we reviewed, veterans reported engaging in frequent sex to avoid negative thoughts, because feeling sexually desirable temporarily suspended those negative thoughts about their self-worth,” she said. APA published voluntary guidelines in 2018 recommending that therapists consider discussing masculine ideology and the effects of cultural expectations of men and boys when treating male veteran clients. Neilson hopes that future research will examine how clinicians already are addressing conformity to masculinity ideology in their treatment of PTSD. “It would not surprise me if some clinicians are already considering how a veteran’s masculinity ideology contributes to their PTSD symptomology and treatment engagement,” she said. “Consistent with APA’s recommendations, I suggest that clinicians discuss beliefs and adherence to traditional masculinity ideologies with the patients. This information is important for conceptualizing patients’ mental health and identifying specific behaviors to target in treatment.” Article: “Traditional Masculinity Ideology, PTSD Symptom Severity and Treatment in Service Members and Veterans: A Systematic Review,” by Elizabeth Neilson, PhD, Michael E. DeBakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Houston, and Morehead State University; R. Sonia Singh, PhD, Michael E. DeBakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Houston, Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System, University of Arkansas and South Central Mental Illness Research, Education and Clinical Center; Kelly Harper, PhD, Michael E. DeBakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Houston, and The National Center for PTSD at Veteran Affairs Boston Healthcare System; and Ellen Teng, PhD, Michael E. DeBakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Houston, Baylor College of Medicine, and South Central Mental Illness Research, Education and Clinical Center.  Psychology of Men and Masculinities, published online Jan. 27, 2020. Full text of the article is available online at https://www.apa.org/pubs/journals/releases/men-men0000257.pdf
Four Purple Heart recipients participated in the 37th annual VFW magazine-Donnan Gulch Outfitters Disabled Veterans Antelope Hunt this past October near Broadus, Mont.    (From left to right) Edwin Ohmann, Barry Johns, Larry Haskett and David Thomas, all Vietnam War veterans, participated in the 2019 VFW magazine-Doonan Gulch Outfitters Disabled Veterans Antelope Hunt in October near Broadus, Mont. The event marked the 37th year of the hunt. Photo by Dave Spiva. Doonan Gulch Outfitters is owned and operated by Russ and Carol Greenwood. The couple started hosting the annual hunt in 1982 because they didn’t like the way Vietnam War veterans were treated when they came home. Russ Greenwood also has a personal connection to Vietnam War veterans. His twin brother – Roger, a member of VFW Post 987 in Baraboo, Wis. – flew helicopters during the war.   While the hunt started as a way to honor veterans of the Vietnam War, it evolved into an event that included veterans of every generation. Larry Haskett, VFW Post 6242 in Beloit, Kan.Larry Haskett is a Vietnam War veteran who served in the Army with C Co., 1st Bn., 26th Inf. Regt., 1st Inf. Div. He arrived in Vietnam September 1966 and left March 1967.  “My family has always been in the military,” Haskett said. “From the Revolutionary War through all major wars, my family has served everywhere.” Haskett said he was wounded during a firefight on Feb. 27, 1967, by a Viet Cong hand grenade.  Haskett, who was an infantryman, said two of his ribs were blown off and three-fourths of his intestines were hanging out of his body.  “When that happened, a medic came over and started working on me,” Haskett said. “Then, the Viet Cong threw another grenade at me. That one didn’t go off.” He was medevacked to Tay Ninh, where he stayed for two weeks, then transported to 106th General Hospital in Yokohama, Japan, where he stayed until May. Haskett spent the remaining four months of his time in the Army at Fort Carson, Colo. Barry Johns, VFW Post 3303 in Newcomerstown, OhioBarry Johns is a Vietnam War veteran who served in the Marine Corps with Charlie Co., 1st Bn., 5th Marines. He arrived in Vietnam October 1968 and left January 1969.  Johns said he was wounded during a firefight southwest of An Hoa Combat Base on Jan. 12, 1969.  “We were doing road security that day,” Johns said. “Some NVS crawled several hundred yards through some tall grass near us, and came up and started shooting at us from about 50 yards away.” Johns said he received a gunshot wound to his spine, as well as wounds from shrapnel, during the fight. He left the country and spent three months on Guam, then to Bethesda Naval Hospital in Maryland. Johns left the Marine Corps in July 1969. Johns said he has “no regrets” from serving in the Marine Corps.  “I’m very proud of my service, but I wouldn’t recommend it for my sons,” Johns said, while laughing. “It’s one of those things that I’m really glad I did, and I would do it again in a heartbeat if I was that young and stupid again.” Edwin Ohmann, VFW Post 9433 in Rosemount, Minn.Edwin Ohmann is a Vietnam War veteran who served in the Army with 3rd Bn., 187th Inf. Regt., 101st Abn. Div. He arrived in Vietnam in August 1970 and left in October.  As a platoon sergeant, Ohmann said he lost both of his legs to a booby trap on Oct. 17.  “It was really stressful when I realized that I lost my legs,” Ohmann said. “I had just had my 21st birthday the month before, and I had 17 men my age or younger under me. I felt responsible for them.” All while having lost his legs, Ohmann said there was a “sense of relief” from his wounds. “I thought, ‘I finally get to go home,’” Ohmann said. “It was like a weight had lifted off of me. Even though I was injured, I was, frankly, a little relieved.”  He spent 10 days in Quang Tri, then a night in Da Nang before leaving the country. After brief stays in Japan and Travis Air Force Base in California, Ohmann spent seven months recovering at Fitzsimmons Army Hospital in Aurora, Colo. He was discharged from the Army in June 1971. Ohmann said he was thankful for the Greenwoods for hosting the antelope not just for him, but for all veterans who fought in war. “They don’t do this out of guilt,” Ohmann said. “They seem like they are doing this because they simply want to help and honor veterans.” David Thomas, VFW Post 1888 in Trenton, Mich.David Thomas is a Vietnam War veteran who served in the Marine Corps with Golf Co., 2nd Bn., 5th Marines. He arrived in Vietnam March 1970 and left in July.  Thomas said he was wounded by a claymore mine blast on July 20 near An Hoa Combat Base, located about 8 miles southwest of Da Nang.  “We were setting up a defensive perimeter the night before,” Thomas said. “I set up a claymore. We heard movement through the night, and I wanted to set it off, but I was denied permission.” Thomas said that his leadership wouldn’t allow him to do it because of recent “friendly fire” incidents within a six-week period. He said there was Marines at a listening post near the perimeter. “In the morning, my squad sergeant told me to go out and get the claymore,” Thomas said. “I told him no, and that I wanted to set it off during the night, but permission was denied.” Thomas said that his platoon sergeant then ordered him to go out and find the claymore. “There was the right amount of authority and intimidation for me to do it,” Thomas said. “I went half way out and remember seeing a big white flash. I wound up on my back.” He lost both legs and was unconscious for at least a week.  “I don’t remember much,” Thomas said. “I almost died twice. I know about one time because I remember it, but the other time I was told by someone else.” After being transported to Yokosuka, Japan, Thomas was sent to Naval Hospital Philadelphia, where he spent months recovering. He was discharged from the Marine Corps in February 1971.  Thomas thanked the Greenwoods for their “hospitality” and dedication to veterans. “A lot of people come up to veterans and say, ‘thank you for your service,’” Thomas said. “But with Russ and Carol, they are putting their money where their mouth is. They donate their time and space for us, and I couldn’t thank them enough for doing so.”
Newswise — In the largest genetic study on anxiety to date, VA researchers found new evidence on the underlying biological causes of the disorder. The study used VA Million Veteran Program (MVP) data to identify regions on the human genome related to anxiety risk. The findings could lead to new understanding and treatment of the condition, which affects 1 in 10 Americans. According to Dr. Dan Levey of the VA Connecticut Healthcare Center and Yale University, one of the lead authors on the study, the findings are "an important step forward" in the understanding of anxiety disorders and how genes contribute to mental conditions. The results appear Jan. 7, 2020, in the American Journal of Psychiatry. Anxiety refers to anticipation of perceived future threats. In anxiety disorders, these concerns are out of proportion to the actual anticipated event, leading to distress and disability. Anxiety disorders often occur alongside other mental health disorders like depression. Only a third of those with anxiety disorders receive treatment. Some forms of psychotherapy, such as cognitive behavioral therapy, have proved effective, as have medications such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. In other fields of medicine, genetic studies have led to precision medicine approaches--tailoring drug treatment to patients' individual genetic and biochemical profiles--for a number of diseases. The researchers hope more genetic insight will lead to similar approaches for anxiety. The researchers compared the genomes of nearly 200,000 MVP participants. They identified five locations on the human genome related to anxiety in Americans of European descent, and one in African Americans. Gene variants at these genome locations could increase anxiety risk, say the scientists. The findings for the African American participants are especially important, says Levey. "Minorities are underrepresented in genetic studies, and the diversity of the Million Veteran Program was essential for this part of the project. The genetic variant we identified occurs only in individuals of African ancestry, and would have been completely missed in less diverse cohorts." The study produced the first genome-wide significant findings on anxiety in African ancestry, notes Levey. About 18% of MVP participants are African American. The anxiety-related genome locations also show overlap with other psychiatric conditions. One of the identified locations has previously been linked with risk for bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. The study also shows genetic overlap between anxiety symptoms and depression, PTSD (which is related to anxiety), and neuroticism--a personality trait that has been shown to increase risk for anxiety and related disorders. The results support the idea that overlap with these other traits is at least partially due to a significant genetic commonality, according to the researchers. MVP is a national, voluntary research program funded by VA's Office of Research and Development. It is one of the world's largest databases of health and genomic information. MVP partners with veterans receiving care in VA to study how genes affect health. As of November 2019, MVP had enrolled more than 800,000 veterans. "MVP has enormous potential for increasing our knowledge about the genetics underlying a huge range of traits, including psychiatric traits. It is one of the best samples in the world for this purpose," said Dr. Joel Gelernter, also of the VA Connecticut Healthcare Center and Yale University. Gelernter is one of the senior authors of the work, together with Dr. Murray Stein of the VA San Diego Healthcare System and University of California San Diego. For more information on MVP, visit http://www.research.va.gov/MVP.   Thumbnail Photo Credit: Robert Lisak